Satellite Mind Control – April 2006 – Mind Reading Satellites – nano robot in veins

Yes, I am a victim of remote mind control. from 2006, When I lived in Paris (France), someone inject into my body nano robot controlled by satellite signal and surely a government entity. Now I find that this control is done by Chinese people I don’t know the real reason behind this control even to avoid the God existence and try to find Death key as they said.

I lived in France from 2000 to 2006, and I leaved this land in 2006 because I was infected by nano robot, these robots are controlled by satellite signal, also someone injected idea into my mind. I return back to Morocco asking for help. The authorities did not believed me, so my family asked me to do psychiatric treatment.

By the way, I discovered day by day who are behind the scene, a group of Four Chinese people destroying my veins and my nerves each night I sleep.

They control my mind, formatting and do many damage in my brain and into my body. My heart don’t beat from 2012 and my memory is destroyed.

Please if you find this message, don’t hesitate to help me, or to advice me.

God bless you.

Satellite Mind Control – April 2006 – Mind Reading Satellites – nano robot in veins

Install and configure MongoDB in Ubuntu

We will install the most recent version of MongoDB from the 10gen repo. This requires us to first register the public key for the 10gen MongoDB apt repository, add the repository, and continue with the MongoDB installation.

Configure MongoDB
sudo apt-key adv --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com --recv 7F0CEB10
sudo echo "deb http://downloads-distro.mongodb.org/repo/ubuntu-upstart dist 10gen" | sudo tee -a /etc/apt/sources.list.d/10gen.list
sudo apt-get -y update
sudo apt-get -y install mongodb-10gen vim curl

Create the database and database user
We need to create our database (proddb) and database user(admin).All commands denoted with ‘>’ are executed inside of MongoDB.

sudo mongo
>use proddb
>db.addUser({user: "admin",pwd: "bacon&eggs",roles: ["dbAdmin"],})
>exit

Modify MongoDB settings
We need to modify our MongoDB configuration to set the bind address to ‘0.0.0.0’ and port to ‘27017’. By default these values should be correct, but we want to ensure these settings are configured explicitly.

sudo vim /etc/mongodb.conf

Ensure the following is set correctly (note this is only a portion of the configuration file):

# mongodb.conf

# Where to store the data.

# Note: if you run mongodb as a non-root user (recommended) you may
# need to create and set permissions for this directory manually,
# e.g., if the parent directory isn't mutable by the mongodb user.
dbpath=/var/lib/mongodb

#where to log
logpath=/var/log/mongodb/mongodb.log

logappend=true

port = 27017
bind_ip = 0.0.0.0

Restart the database
Now just restart the database for the changes to take effect.

sudo service mongodb restart

Install and configure MongoDB in Ubuntu

Fork from github and add change to your own repository

When playing with vagrant, I set up a haproxy keepalived apache stack on ubuntu precise.
For that I forked this repository vagrant-haproxy-demo from github (https://github.com/justintime/vagrant-haproxy-demo.git) that run a haproxy standalone instance and I append my change to it to support keepalived.

First of all, I create the repository vagrant-haproxy-keepalived.
and I set remote origin to the repository created.
I create a new branch named development, I modify code and I do a commit.

Finally I checkout to master and rebase the branch development.


git remote set-url origin https://github.com/mezgani/vagrant-haproxy-keepalived.git
git checkout -b development
git add .
git commit -a
git checkout master
git rebase development
git push origin master

My code is here https://github.com/mezgani/vagrant-haproxy-keepalived.git, you can browse code.

Fork from github and add change to your own repository

Build nginx flask vagrant vbox on windows

Before this post I wrote and article on how to serve flask on ubuntu.
I share with you my first contact with vagrant, on a windows box I build a virtualbox vm that run nginx, and a flask “hello world” application.

here the Vagrantfile

# -*- mode: ruby -*-
# vi: set ft=ruby :

Vagrant.configure("2") do |config|

hostname = "propus"
locale = "en_GB.UTF.8"

# Box
config.vm.box = "ubuntu/trusty64"

# Shared folders
config.vm.synced_folder ".", "/var/www/ovpn"

# Port forwarding
config.vm.network :forwarded_port, guest: 80, host: 8080

# Setup
config.vm.provision :shell, :inline => "touch .hushlogin"
config.vm.provision :shell, :inline => "hostnamectl set-hostname #{hostname} && locale-gen #{locale}"
config.vm.provision :shell, :inline => "apt-get update --fix-missing"
config.vm.provision :shell, :inline => "apt-get install -q -y g++ make git vim"

# Lang
config.vm.provision :shell, :inline => "apt-get install -q -y python python-dev python-distribute python-pip"

# nginx
config.vm.provision :shell, :inline => "apt-get install -q -y nginx"

config.vm.provision :shell, :path => "bootstrap.sh"

end

And here is the bootstrap.sh script content

#!/bin/bash

pip install virtualenv
mkdir -p /var/www/ovpn && cd /var/www/ovpn
mkdir /var/log/uwsgi/
virtualenv -p /usr/bin/python venv
source venv/bin/activate
pip install uwsgi
pip install flask
rm -f /etc/nginx/conf.d/default
cat <> /etc/nginx/conf.d/ovpn

server {
listen 80;
server_name 10.0.1.15;
charset utf-8;
client_max_body_size 75M;

location / { try_files $uri @ovpn; }
location @ovpn {
include uwsgi_params;
uwsgi_pass unix:/tmp/demoapp_uwsgi.sock;
}
}
EOF

cat <>/var/www/ovpn/demoapp_uwsgi.ini
[uwsgi]
#application's base folder
base = /var/www/ovpn

#python module to import
app = hello
module = %(app)

home = %(base)/venv
pythonpath = %(base)

#socket file’s location
socket = /tmp/%n.sock

#permissions for the socket file
chmod-socket = 666

#the variable that holds a flask application inside the module imported at line #6
callable = application

#location of log files
logto = /var/log/uwsgi/%n.log
EOF

/etc/init.d/nginx restart

Place the Vagrantfile and the bootstrap.sh in the same directory.
and from powershell console Run:

vagrant up

This will build the vm image. have a fun !

Build nginx flask vagrant vbox on windows

Understanding Linux Load Average – Part 3

Originally posted on The Dutch Prutser's Blog:

In part 1 we performed a series of experiments to explore the relation between CPU utilization and Linux load average. We concluded that the load average is influenced by processes running on or waiting for the CPU. Based on experiments in part 2 we came to the conclusion that processes that are performing disk I/O also influence the load average on a Linux system. In this posting we will do another experiment to find out if the Linux load average is also affected by processes performing network I/O.

Network I/O and load average

To check if a correlation exists between processes performing network I/O and the load average we will start 10 processes generating network I/O on an otherwise idle system and collect various performance related statistics using the sar command. Note: My load-gen script uses the ping command to generate network I/O.

The above output shows that the lo

View original 602 more words

Understanding Linux Load Average – Part 3

Understanding Linux Load Average – Part 2

Originally posted on The Dutch Prutser's Blog:

In part 1 we performed a series of experiments to explore the relation between CPU utilization and Linux load average. We came to the conclusion that CPU utilization clearly influences the load average. In part 2 we will continue our experiments and take a look if disk I/O also influences the Linux load average.

Disk I/O and load average

The first experiment is starting 2 processes performing disk I/O on an otherwise idle system to measure the amount I/O issued, the load average and CPU utilization using the sar command. BTW: My load-gen script uses the dd command to generate disk I/O.

The -b command line option given to sar tells it to report disk I/O statistics. The above output tells us that on average 48207 blocks per second were written to disk and almost nothing was read. What effect does this have on the load average?

The run-queue utilization…

View original 565 more words

Understanding Linux Load Average – Part 2

Understanding Linux Load Average – Part 1

Ali MEZGANI:

Very nice article on how to detect load average issue

Originally posted on The Dutch Prutser's Blog:

A frequently asked question in my classroom is “What is the meaning of load average and when is it too high?”. This may sound like an easy question, and I really thought it was, but recently I discovered that things aren’t always that easy as they seem. In this first of a three-part post I will explain what the meaning of Linux load average is and how to diagnose load averages that may seem too high.

Obtaining the current load average is very simple by issuing the uptime command:

But what is the meaning of these 3 numbers? Basically load average is the run-queue utilization averaged over the last minute, the last 5 minutes and the last 15 minutes. The run-queue is a list of processes waiting for a resource to become available inside the Linux operating system. The example above indicates that on average there were 10.52 processes waiting…

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Understanding Linux Load Average – Part 1