Merge the remote changes before pushing again. "not a fast forward"

When you try to push and you get this message that’s mean that someone else has changed after your last fetch.
Well in this case you have to incorporate their changes before you can add yours typically, you’ll want to rebase rather than merge and you’ll also want to test the joined version.

$ git fetch
$ git diff master…origin/master

that’ll show changes of upstream
$ git fetch origin
$ git rebase origin/master
$ git push prigin master

Merge the remote changes before pushing again. "not a fast forward"

Merge the remote changes before pushing again. “not a fast forward”

When you try to push and you get this message that’s mean that someone else has changed after your last fetch.
Well in this case you have to incorporate their changes before you can add yours typically, you’ll want to rebase rather than merge and you’ll also want to test the joined version.

$ git fetch
$ git diff master…origin/master

that’ll show changes of upstream
$ git fetch origin
$ git rebase origin/master
$ git push prigin master

Merge the remote changes before pushing again. “not a fast forward”

What is difference between register and memory?

Registers are storage locations internal the the processor. CPU instructions operate on these values directly. On RISC processors, all data
must be moved into a register before it can be operated. On CISC (Intel) chips, there are a few operations that can load data from RAM, process it,
and save the result back out, but the fastest operations work directly with registers.

Also, there are registers that are set aside for certain tasks, these generally include a program counter, stack, and flags.
Each register also has a size that determines the maximum amount of data that can be processed at a time. The registers on Pentium chips, for
example, are 32 bits.

Finally, there are generally only a few registers available on a processer. Intel chips, for example, have 6 general purpose registers, and several
specialized registers including a base register, stack register, flags register, program counter, and some addressing registers.

Memory, or RAM, is located external to the CPU. Generally speaking, data has to be loaded into a CPU register from memory before the CPU can process
it, RAM is much slower than registers, there is a lot more RAM than registers, and generally memory can be addressed on a byte boundaries, where registers
may not be able to access all the bytes in a register.

To summarize: in general, registers are temporary storage in the CPU that holds the data the processor is currently working on, while RAM holds the
program instructions and the data the program requires.

What is difference between register and memory?